Home > Foreign Language > Use Reduced Adverb Clauses Correctly

Use Reduced Adverb Clauses Correctly

Adverb clauses can also appear in a reduced form. In the reduced form, the  adverb connector remains, but the subject and be-verb are omitted.

  • Although he is rather unwell, the speaker will take part in the  seminar.
  • When you are ready, you can begin your speech.

These two examples may be used in either the complete or reduced form. In  the reduced form, the adverb connectors although and when remain; the  subjects he and you as well as the be-verbs is and are are omitted.

If there is no be-verb in the adverb clause, it is still possible to have a  reduced form. When there is no be-verb in the adverb clauses, the subject is  omitted and the main verb is changed into the -ing form.

  • Although he feels rather sick, the speaker will take part in the seminar. [feeling]
  • When you give your speech, you should speak loudly and distinctly. [giving]

In the first example the adverb clause although he feels rather sick does not include a be-verb; to reduce this clause; the subject he is omitted and the main verb feels is changed to feeling. In the second example the adverb clause when you give your speech also does not include a be-verb; to reduce this clause, the subject you is omitted and the main verb give is changed to giving.

The  following chart lists the structures for reduced adverb clauses and which adverb clause connector can be used in a reduced form:

Reduced  adverb clauses
With a be-verb in the adverb clause (Adverb connector) (Subject) (BE)
With no be-verb in the adverb clause (Adverb connector) (Subject) (VERB + ING)
Time Condition Contrast Place Manner
Reduces in ACTIVE After

Before

Since

While

If

Unless

Whether

Although

Though

Reduces in PASSIVE Once

Untill

When

Whenever

If

Unless

Whether

Although

Though

Where

wherever

As
  • To reduce an adverb clause, omit the subject and the be-verb from the adverb clause.
  • If there is no be-verb, then omit the subject and change the verb to the –ing form

19.01.2010

Dennis

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Categories: Foreign Language
  1. November 10, 2010 at 10:59 pm | #1

    Did you notice that in the example:

    •When you give your speech, you should speak loudly and distinctly. [giving]

    When is reducing from an active sentence and in the chart below that example it says that can only happen whan WHEN is used in a passive sentence?? Can anyone explain why that is happening??. That’s not the only example that happens like that. I need to find an answer for my students. Thanks.

  2. Dennis
    August 26, 2011 at 8:10 am | #2

    Yeah. When giving your speech, you should speak loudly and distinctly. It’s right Enrique Espejel.

    • October 17, 2011 at 4:58 am | #3

      A better rule is to determine whether the subject of the verb is in active or passive voice. Active voice always reduces to -ing and passive always reduces to -ed.

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